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1/16/1997 - Feminist Majority Condemns Atlanta Bombing, Calls for Classification of Anti-Abortion Violence as Domestic Terrorism

New Survey Finds Severe Anti-abortion Violence Still Plagues Almost One-Third of Clinics


As the Feminist Majority Foundation, National Abortion Federation, and Planned Parenthood Federation of America were holding a press conference this morning on anti-abortion violence at clinics, we received word that yet another clinic has been destroyed by a bomb. We were horrified and outraged by news of this tragedy, but hardly surprised since our press conference was called to bring attention to the persistent violence being targeted at abortion clinics nationwide. In fact, our newly released 1996 National Clinic Survey had revealed an increase in clinic bombings between 1995 and 1996.
Passage and enforcement of the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act and pro-choice vigilance have reduced the percentage of clinics experiencing severe violence from over 50% in 1995 to 29.5% today. But to further reduce the violence we believe that anti-abortion violence must be classified as domestic terrorism and that increased federal, state, and local law enforcement resources must be allocated to crack the reign of terror.

Unacceptably high levels of violence continue at abortion clinics, putting clinic personnel, patients, and abortion rights in peril. As today’s bombing and our survey amply demonstrate, clinic violence is not a thing of the past. Our data and our day-in-day-out work with clinics tell us that the violence has by no means ended. Just two weeks ago a physician in New Orleans was brutally stabbed 15 times by an assailant who then traveled to a Baton Rouge clinic, where he was found lying in wait for a second physician. Fortunately, because of the vigilance of pro-choice advocates in New Orleans, this man, who is from Texas is now behind bars and is being charged with attempted murder.

Our survey shows conclusively that better law enforcement has the capacity to decrease violence. Clinics which reported ‘excellent’ law enforcement response experienced lower levels of violence than those which characterized law enforcement response as ‘poor.’ Clinics with buffer zones saw greater decreases in violence than those without buffer zone protection.

On the eve of the 24th anniversary of Roe v. Wade and an anticipated weekend of anti-abortion activities at clinics, it serves no one’s interest to allow pro-choice activists, clinics, and the media to be lulled into a sense of false security. Instead, we need to focus on improving response at all levels of law enforcement.


1/16/1997 - New Feminist Majority Foundation Survey Finds Severe Anti-abortion Violence Still Plagues Almost One-Third of Clinics

Data Refute Spate of News Articles Saying Violence Is Over

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- A newly released survey, conducted by the Feminist Majority Foundation, reveals that 29.5% of clinics faced severe anti-abortion violence in 1996. Severe types of violence included death threats, stalking, bombings and bomb threats, arsons and arson threats, blockades, invasions and chemical attacks. When gunfire, home picketing, and vandalism are combined with the other violence variables, the number of clinics and offices experiencing some form of violence, harassment or intimidation rises to 45.8%. “
Unacceptably high levels of violence continue at abortion clinics, putting clinic personnel, patients, and abortion rights in peril,” said Eleanor Smeal, President of the Feminist Majority Foundation. “Pro-choice vigilance, increased security measures at clinics, and improvements in law enforcement have reduced anti-abortion violence at women’s health clinics for the second consecutive year, but the rate of decline has slowed.”

Our systematic, social science survey contradicts recent impressionistic news accounts that say clinic violence is a thing of the past. Although the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act continues to be an effective tool in reducing clinic violence, our data and our day-in-day-out work with clinics tells us that the violence has by no means ended. Just two weeks ago a physician in New Orleans was brutally stabbed 15 times by an assailant who then traveled to a Baton Rouge clinic, where he was found lying in wait for a second physician. Fortunately, because of the vigilance of pro-choice advocates in New Orleans, this man, who is from Texas is now behind bars and is being charged with attempted murder.” Roe v. Wade and an anticipated weekend of anti-abortion activities at clinics, it serves no one’s interest to allow pro-choice activists, clinics, and the media to be lulled into a sense of false security. Instead, we need to focus on improving response at all levels of law enforcement.” “

The survey shows conclusively that better law enforcement has the capacity to decrease violence. Clinics which reported ‘excellent’ law enforcement response experienced lower levels of violence than those which characterized law enforcement response as ‘poor.’ And some aspects of law enforcement clearly are working. Clinics tell us that their reports of FACE violations are now being treated seriously. Buffer zones also are working -- the one-third of clinics which have buffer zones saw the greater decreases in violence than those without buffer zone protection,” said Smeal.

The survey found that clinics also are looking forward to being able to introduce new medical technologies to women which may diminish anti-abortion violence; over two-thirds (69.9%) of clinics are interested in providing mifepristone to their patients.

The survey, which covered violence committed during the first seven months of 1995, was completed by 312 clinics from 45 states and the District of Columbia. Ninety-five percent of these clinics offer a full range of gynecological and other health services in addition to abortion.


1/15/1997 - Citadel Alumni Call for Action on Hazing of Women Cadets

Hampton Walker, president of the 18,000-member Association of Citadel Men, has demanded the Citadel uncover the truth about the parties responsible for the hazing of two women cadets who have decided to leave the formerly all-male military college and transfer to the University of South Carolina. Walker said, “This doesn’t take any lengthy investigations and waiting around for a lot of reports. They should know what’s going on.” Walker said the alumni were ashamed of allegations that the Citadel did not ensure the safety of Kim Messer and Jeanie Mentavlos who say they were sexually harassed and had their clothes set on fire and their mouths filled with cleanser as part of illegal hazing. Interim Citadel president Clifton Poole has addressed the entire corps of cadets to warn against such behavior and says he takes responsibility for the treatment of the women cadets.

Two male cadets have been suspended pending a review while nine others have been charged with violations of the Citadel’s rules and regulations.


1/15/1997 - NOW and Other Groups Call Off Boycott Against Mitsubishi

National Organization for Women president Patricia Ireland and National Rainbow Coalition/PUSH founder Rev. Jesse Jackson have announced that they have called off their boycott of Mitsubishi which was inspired by widespread allegations of sexual harassment at the company’s Normal, Illinois plant. NOW, the Rainbow Coalition, the National Council of Negro Women and the National Minority Automobile Dealers came together with Mitsubishi on January 15 to announce the agreement. A prepared statement made by Jackson said the company has made a “commitment to end the hostile workplace environment for women and people of color, to pursue vigorously the resolution of this sex and race harassment crisis in Normal, Ill.” According to a statement prepared by Ireland, “With this commitment of Mitsubishi, we move from an adversarial and confrontational relationship to a partnership with the mutual goal of a model workplace and fair business practices.”

Twenty-nine women have filed a sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuit against the company, and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has filed another lawsuit on behalf of some 300 women who were allegedly fondled, propositioned, and threatened by male workers at the plant.


1/15/1997 - Henderson Allowed to Continue to Hear Prop 209 Suit

A federal judge in San Francisco ruled on January 14 that Judge Thelton Henderson can continue to hear the lawsuit against Proposition 209, the anti-affirmative action measure in California. Responding to objections that Henderson’s past membership of the American Civil Liberties Union would taint his ruling of the measure, U.S. District Judge Fern Smith said that Henderson’s “past membership in an organization which supports affirmative action does not render him unable to preside fairly over any case involving the question of affirmative action.” The group objecting to Henderson presiding over the case may appeal Smith’s decision.

Henderson issued a preliminary injunction blocking Prop 209 on December 23, putting the ruling on hold until a trial determines its constitutionality. Opponents of the measure have argued that Prop 209 violates the Constitution by keeping women and people of color from programs that would rectify discrimination while not keeping such opportunities from veterans and other groups.


1/15/1997 - Supreme Court Defines “15-Employee” Rule for Job Bias Cases

The Supreme Court has overturned a lower-court decision which dismissed a case in which the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued a company for illegally firing Darlene Walters. After being denied a promotion in 1990, Walters filed a gender-bias charge with the EEOC against Metropolitan Educational Enterprises and was subsequently fired. Lower courts dismissed the case on the grounds that it was not covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which limits anti-discrimination provisions to companies with 15 or more employees. The Supreme Court ruled on January 14 that employees are counted “for each working day after arrival and before departure” thus requiring Metropolitan to comply with Title VII. Previous rulings have based the number of employees on how many calendar weeks she or he worked.


1/14/1997 - Smeal Exposes Real Hypocrites of Paula Jones Scandal

Amid allegations that women’s groups have been hypocritical for failing to offer support to Paula Jones in her sexual harassment suit against President Clinton similar to that offered to Anita Hill, Feminist Majority president Eleanor Smeal has publicly clarified the distinctions between the two cases. "What is before the Supreme Court today is the power of the presidency, not sexual harassment law," said Smeal. However, the attorneys for Paula Jones have been casting things in a different light. Gil Davis and Joe Cammarata have taken the time the weekend before and day of the Supreme Court hearing to attack feminists on charges of hypocrisy. This strategic attack on feminists has been pursued since the beginning of this case.

Since Jones' press conference in 1994 when she levied her charges against Clinton, Jones has been surrounded by right wing opponents of women's rights who have attacked feminists. Supporting Jones have been a plethora of right wing organizations including the Landmark Legal Foundation, which supported Clarence Thomas' nomination to the Supreme Court and the Legal Affairs Council, which raised $300,000 for the defense of Oliver North during the Iran-Contra scandal.

"Hypocrisy," exclaimed Smeal, "look at the people who brought Jones to the public eye -- Floyd Brown, director of Citizen's United and developer of the Willie Horton ad; David Brock, writer for American Spectator and author of The Real Anita Hill; and Pat Mahoney, director of Christian Defense Coalition and one-time spokesperson for Operation Rescue. These people are not champions of women's rights."

"The feminist track record on the issue of sexual harassment is irrefutable. Sexual harassment should be treated seriously, and feminists have never wavered from this position. However, the born-again feminists of the right wing dismissed Anita Hill and were stridently anti-women's rights and anti-discrimination laws including sexual harassment laws. Now, who is the hypocrite?"

Anita Hill and Paula Jones are very different cases. In the 1991 Anita Hill case, feminists fought for a hearing on charges of sexual harassment before Clarence Thomas was appointed to the Supreme Court, and feminists demanded Anita Hill be heard publicly after the Senate's decision to close the hearings. In 1995, although Senator Bob Packwood (R-O) was pro-choice and a supporter of women's rights, feminists fought for the Senate Ethics Committee to open hearings on the sexual harassment charges brought against him. "Jones vs. Clinton, from the beginning, has been a court trial because Jones filed within the statute of limitations. Paula Jones will be heard," stated Smeal.


1/14/1997 - Citadel President Addresses Cadets About Hazing Incidents

Clifton Poole, interim president for the Citadel, spoke to the 1,700-member Corps of Cadets at the South Carolina military college on January 13 after two of the four female first-year cadets announced they would not be returning to the formerly all-male school. Poole admitted that the Citadel’s anti-hazing system had broken down and stated at a press conference following the cadet meeting that “all incidents of hazing will be reported to law enforcement.”

Eleven male cadets face discipline regarding charges by Kim Messer and Jeanie Mentavlos that the men set the women’s clothes on fire, put cleanser in their mouths and sexually harassed them. Messer and Mentavlos stated that the Citadel failed to keep the women safe and that they could not return to the school. Mentavlos’ brother, Michael, also plans to withdraw from the school just three credits short of graduation.

Messer’s lawyer questioned the Citadel’s commitment to making coeducation work. Attorney E. Paul Gibson said,” I question ... if (the Citadel administrators) know how seriously they’ll have to approach (coeducation) to make it work. The Citadel has expended huge amounts of capital and energy to prevent the entry of women. That’s what it impressed on the corps. Now they say they’ve made a 180-degree turn.”


1/14/1997 - Postmenopausal Health Study Needs Volunteers

The National Institutes of Health and the Women’s Health Initiative are seeking participants for a study on postmenopausal women’s health that could lead to discoveries about preventing heart disease, breast cancer, and other diseases. After three years of recruiting efforts, only 87,782 of the expected 163,500 slots were filled as of November, one year short of the recruitment cut-off. Areas with the most need in women to take or forgo hormones, women over the age of 65 and minority women. Interested women aged 50 to 79 are invited to call 1-800-549-6636.


1/14/1997 - Korean Women Pressured to Abort Girl Babies to Try for Sons

Although fetal sex identification and abortion are against the law in South Korea, women continue to feel pressure to abort girl fetuses in order to try for sons. Compared to a natural ratio of 105 boys born for every 100 girls (which later evens out to 1:1 since boys die earlier), some regions in South Korea have rates of 125 boys born to every 100 girls resulting in 30,000 fewer girls born each year than would be the case without sex-influenced abortions. The overall ratio in Korea is 116 boys to 100 girls. A Chinese government report in 1992 found the ratio in China at 118.5 boys to 100 girls, statistics which embarrassed the government enough that it never formally released the results.

Korean families are often disappointed when women produce daughters while news of boys is cause for celebration. “My mother-in-law called up my sister-in-law three times to tell her it was a boy,” said Lee Tae-rim, already a mother of two girls. “Soon after I delivered my son, my parents-in-law moved us into a larger apartment. They figured we needed an extra room for the baby boy.” Since women traditionally marry into the husband’s family, Koreans see a sonless family as one that will die when the father dies. However, women have recently made other gains in the country whose government legally removed discrimination against women in the inheritance of property. The government has also banned “males-only” job advertisements. Despite a 1994 ban on aborting female fetuses, however, the act remains common.


1/14/1997 - For the Record: Statement of Feminist Majority President Eleanor Smeal on Clinton v. Jones

"What is before the Supreme Court today is the power of the presidency, not sexual harassment law," said Eleanor Smeal, President of the Feminist Majority. However, the attorneys for Paula Jones have been casting things in a different light. Gil Davis and Joe Cammarata have taken the time the weekend before and day of the Supreme Court hearing to attack feminists on charges of hypocrisy. This strategic attack on feminists has been pursued since the beginning of this case.
Since Jones' press conference in 1994 when she levied her charges against Clinton, Jones has been surrounded by right wing opponents of women's rights who have attacked feminists. Supporting Jones have been a plethora of right wing organizations including the Landmark Legal Foundation, which supported Clarence Thomas' nomination to the Supreme Court and the Legal Affairs Council, which raised $300,000 for the defense of Oliver North during the Iran-Contra scandal.

"Hypocrisy," exclaimed Smeal, "look at the people who brought Jones to the public eye -- Floyd Brown, director of Citizen's United and developer of the Willie Horton ad; David Brock, writer for American Spectator and author of The Real Anita Hill; and Pat Mahoney, director of Christian Defense Coalition and one-time spokesperson for Operation Rescue. These people are not champions of women's rights."

"The feminist track record on the issue of sexual harassment is irrefutable. Sexual harassment should be treated seriously, and feminists have never wavered from this position. However, the born-again feminists of the right wing dismissed Anita Hill and were stridently anti-women's rights and anti-discrimination laws including sexual harassment laws. Now, who is the hypocrite?"

Anita Hill and Paula Jones are very different cases. In the 1991 Anita Hill case, feminists fought for a hearing on charges of sexual harassment before Clarence Thomas was appointed to the Supreme Court, and feminists demanded Anita Hill be heard publicly after the Senate's decision to close the hearings. In 1995, although Senator Bob Packwood (R-O) was pro-choice and a supporter of women's rights, feminists fought for the Senate Ethics Committee to open hearings on the sexual harassment charges brought against him. "Jones vs. Clinton, from the beginning, has been a court trial because Jones filed within the statute of limitations. Paula Jones will be heard," stated Smeal.


1/13/1997 - Affirmative Action Hires Are As or More Qualified than White Male Counterparts, Study Finds

A new study conducted by two Michigan State researchers has found that persons hired through affirmative action programs are as qualified, and in many cases more qualified, than their white male counterparts. Economists Harry Hgolzner and David Neumark studied more than 3,200 randomly-selected employers in Detroit, Atlanta, Boston and Los Angeles. The researchers found that, "Black females hired under affirmative action obtain higher performance ratings than white males hired in similar firms." Furthermore, "The evidence for white females, black males, Hispanic females, also indicates that their performance is not lower than that of white males in similar firms." The researchers concluded that, "There is essentially no performance shortfall among most groups of women and minorities hired under affirmative action


1/13/1997 - Two Citadel Women Won't Return for Second Semester Among Allegations of Severe Harassment

Kim Messer and Jeanie Mentavlos, citing severe hazing and the school's failure to protect them, will not return to the Citadel to finish their first semester. Kim Messer commented, "It is apparent to me...that while I might be physically safe on campus, I would not be welcome...I never asked for special treatment at The Citadel, I received special treatment...of criminal assaults, sadistic illegal hazing and disgusting incidents of sexual harassment." The two women and their families allege that the chain of command at The Citadel did not respond when the women told them that male cadets were harassing them. Knowing no one believed them, Mentavlos at one point put a tape recorder in her pants to record the incidents, but a male cadet ordered her to drop her pants, behind a desk, and turn over the tape recorder. Messer went on to comment, "[The Citadel's administration] is incapable of impressing on some of its cadets what is expected of every member of the United States military - the requirement that they obey the law and follow orders...When the criminal investigations are complete, it will be shown that The Citadel's administration either knew or should have known...of the complete failure of its command structure." Mentavlos' brother, a senior cadet at The Citadel only three credits shy of graduating, will also not return to complete his degree because of "current circumstances."


1/13/1997 - Employee Job Discrimination Suits Increase

While the federal government is cutting back on anti-discrimination efforts, employees are joining together to sue companies themselves for persistent discrimination. Federal lawsuits alleging discrimination have doubled in the past four years and now involve approximately 100,000 employees. These cases are coming before the courts as class actions and thus represent an entire class of employees, not just individual complainants. Recently, Texaco Inc. agreed to pay a $140 million settlement to employees who claimed race discrimination, and companies including State Farm, Shoney's Inc. and Lucky Stores have had to pay a combined total in excess of $100 million for discriminatory practices. Pending cases include sex discrimination cases against Home Depot Inc., Publix Super Markets, and Glorious Food. Pending race and sex discrimination cases include Motel 6 LP, Dun & Bradstree and Smith Barney Inc.


1/13/1997 - Evelyn Davis, Founder of New York Coalition of 100 Black Women Dies at 75

Evelyn Davis who founded the New York Coalition of 100 Black Women and was a former vice-president of the Children's Television Workshop, died of cancer on January 9, 1997. Ms. Davis led efforts to make "Sesame Street" known to inner-city parents and children since its inception in 1969. She saw Sesame Street as an innovative program, a sort of televised Head Start, and oversaw staff members who visited inner-city communities to bring the show to the areas. In the early 1970's she founded the New York Coalition of 100 Black Woman which urges black women to become involved in politics. The group's projects include holding voter registration drives in Harlem and helping young black women establish personal networks.


1/13/1997 - Survey Shows Women Feel Mistreated While Traveling

A recent study by Uniglobe Travel (International) Inc. has found that women still feel biases when traveling. Michelle Desreux, senior vice president of the company, said that security issues were a major concern. Women should specify with their travel agents that they would like secure rooms, near elevators, with no outside ground floor access and not in a remote areas of hotel properties. She also said that gender biases remain in various formats and that travel companies often give men better attention than women, "This attitude permeates everything from supplier advertising that focuses only on men to face-to-face client service. No doubt, service across the board has improved but women travelers report that gender biases by suppliers continue."


1/13/1997 - Judge Appoints Lawyer for Inmate's Fetus

Jailed on drug charges, a pregnant New Jersey woman is scheduled to be temporarily released so that she may have an abortion. Judge Leonard Arnold, however, has appointed an anti-abortion lawyer to represent the woman's fetus in court. The ACLU and the Morristown Legal Center for the Defense of Life have been in court over the woman's fourth month old fetus and Judge Arnold appointed the fetus a lawyer because, "I have decided that this unborn child requires representation." David Rocah, a lawyer for the ACLU commented that this appointment completely stepped beyond the bounds of judicial power; "New Jersey courts have held over and over that a fetus is not a person," Rocah said. The ACLU will appeal the court's decision to appoint the lawyer.


1/10/1997 - Connerly Creates National Organization to End Affirmative Action

Ward Connerly, the University of California Regent who led the fight to pass the California anti-affirmative action Proposition 209, plans to start a national organization dedicated to ending equal opportunity programs for women and people of color. Though a judge has continued the injunction on 209 in California, over 20 other states are introducing anti-affirmative action legislation.


1/10/1997 - Columnist Judy Mann Returns to Washington Post After Fighting Breast Cancer

Columnist Judy Mann returned to The Washington Post to work with a column on January 9, 1997 entitled Discovering Cancer, Embracing Life. In it she discusses breast cancer, her diagnosis and treatment. She wrote, "I have always thought that a mastectomy followed by chemotherapy would be a woman's worst nightmare...But perhaps the most important thing I can share with you now is that it is, in the immortal words of my friend and fellow cancer veteran, Susan Lowell Butler doable. You can get through it." She also warns women to get yearly mammograms, "Let me and my sister be a warning: A disease-free family history means nothing. I am now convinced that environmental toxins, combined with a Western diet, overexposure to estrogen, and the tremendously stressful lives most women lead, are contributing to an epidemic attacking younger and younger women. Every woman is at risk, and early detection provides the best chance for recovery."

Mann is a longtime feminist who has written extensively for the Post and in 1994 published a book entitled, The Difference: Growing Up Female in America.


1/10/1997 - Marcia Clark to Host Show Featuring Women in Law Enforcement

Marcia Clark, one of the lead prosecutors in the O.J. Simpson criminal murder trial, has resigned from the Los Angeles District Attorney's office. In announcing her resignation, Clark commented, "I hope to continue to champion the causes of truth and justice in other arenas, and to focus on lending my support to the advancement of women." Along with working on a book detailing her work on the Simpson case, Clark will host a half-hour daily show about women in law enforcement. Clark commented on the show, "I'm honored to have been chosen to help present the stories of the admirable and distinguished women who have chosen to accept the challenges of a demanding yet fulfilling career in law enforcement." Producers of the show commented, "From cops on the street, corrections officers, parole officers, Border Patrol, DEA, FBI, Secret Service and military personnel to judges and prosecutors, the series will be a tribute to dedicated women in all fields of law enforcement."


1/10/1997 - Ellen Producers Working on Outing Episode

Producers for the television show Ellen have confirmed that they are working on a show revealing that the main character, Ellen, is a lesbian. The producers have not, however, made a final determination as to whether or not that show will air. Jamie Tarses, president of ABC entertainment, said on January 8, 1997 that it's "wait-and-see" on whether ABC will air the episode. Tarses told reporters at the semiannual Television Critics Association meeting that, "We are very seriously considering about going in the direction that everyone's speculating on." The show will go off the air in March and April and will return in May.


1/10/1997 - Virginia State Senator Claims Men in Military Training Can't Keep themselves from Sexually Harassing Women

Warren E. Barry, a 63-year-old Republican Fairfax, Virginia Senator has claimed that the Virginia Military Institute should not admit women because the coexistence of women and women in the military inevitably results in sexual harassment. Barry also commented that admitting the women will overburden courts already flooded with sexual harassment suits. Senator Janet Howell, a Democratic Senator from Fairfax responded to Barry’s comments by saying that, "It's hard not to be offended when someone insults your gender and they try to limit your potential...the [teenage Senate pages] are coming up to me and saying they couldn't believe he said what he did." Former State Senator Emilie F. Miller pointed out that only 30% of graduates from military institutes go on to careers in the Armed Services and said, "The only barrier is the intellectual one, which is, men are scared that when women go in there, they are going to best them intellectually."

Two women Citadel cadets and their families who alleged that the women were hazed during their first semester at the South Carolina school met with a federal judge on January 8, 1997. Federal Judge C. Weston Houck is overseeing the integration of four women cadets into the formerly all-male Citadel met privately with the women and families to discuss security if they return to the school. He assured them that, "We will be able to put into place some reasonable measures to make sure it's likely they won't come to harm."


1/9/1997 - Study Debunks Ties Between Abortion and Breast Cancer

New research, conducted in Denmark, shows that women who have early-term abortions are not more likely to get breast cancer than women who do not have abortions. In the largest study of the relationship between abortion and breast cancer to date, a study, published in the January 8, 1997 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, reviewed all cases of breast cancer and abortion in Denmark among 1.5 million women born between 1935 and 1978. Early studies conflicted on whether or not abortions led to a risk of breast cancer. Those that did find a correlation were often criticized, however, because they relied on women disclosing their medical histories. Women who had already been diagnosed with breast cancer were more likely to disclose having had an abortion in the past. Therefore, the number of women who had abortions and breast cancer might seem artificially higher than those women who had breast cancer and did not have abortions. The Denmark study avoided such a discrepancy because all persons in Denmark receive medical identification numbers and have records with their entire medical history on them. Thus, the researchers went through files which accurately reflected all women's medical histories.


1/9/1997 - Citadel Cadet Admits to Harassing Female Cadets

One of the eleven cadets suspended in alleged hazing against two female cadets at the Citadel has admitted to the harassment. The male cadet admitted to throwing fingernail polish remover on two of the four female cadets; the polish remover is a flammable substance and the women claim that their clothes were also set on fire. The cadet also admitted to threatening to cut one of the women's "heart out" if he ever saw her off campus. The FBI, school officials and South Carolina state police are all continuing their investigation of the hazing allegations. The two women, who have not reported being harassed, have corroborated some of the details of the other women's allegations.


1/9/1997 - Thomas Declines Speech After NAACP Threatens Protest

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, who had earlier accepted an invitation to speak at a Delaware Boy and Girl's Club youth banquet, has withdrawn his offer to speak after the NAACP threatened to protest the speech. The NAACP issued a statement that Thomas was not a good role model for the youth, citing his opposition to affirmative action and other civil rights for people of color.