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1/21/1997 - Albright Unanimously Confirmed by Senate Foreign Relations Committee

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee unanimously voted to confirm Madeleine Albright as the first female Secretary of State of the United States on January 20th. The full Senate should vote on her confirmation by January 22nd. The committee's ranking Democrat, Senator Joseph Biden (D-Del) said that he expected her confirmation to "sail through the senate."


1/21/1997 - Martin Luther King Jr. III Starts Pro-Affirmative Action Group

In response to Ward Connerly's founding of a national group to wipe out equal opportunity programs for women and people of color, Martin Luther King's eldest son has founded and will head Americans United for Affirmative Action. The new Atlanta-based group will work to preserve affirmative action. King commented on January 18th near the memorial of his father, "Our country is currently embroiled in a backlash against hard-won gains made during the civil rights movement - namely, affirmative action."


1/21/1997 - Woman Sues Estee Lauder Exec for Harassment

Estee Lauder employee Barbara Gretzen filed a $1 million sexual harassment against a top male executive of the company on January 14 in Manhattan Supreme Court. Gretzen’s suit alleges that she had to take a job in another division at a lower salary in order to avoid unwanted sexual advances by Aramis men’s division president Robert Nielsen. According to Gretzen’s suit, Nielsen allegedly told Gretzen that he had an erotic dream about her and had “sexual thoughts” about her constantly. Gretzen alleges that Nielsen cost her a promotion to executive assistant for Estee Lauder chairman Leonard Lauder and also relinquished the possibility of a promotion to marketing after Gretzen told her his unwanted advances made her uncomfortable.


1/21/1997 - Global Summit for Women Draws Hundreds to Miami

Hundreds of women from 44 nations around the world attended the Women’s Global Summit in Miami January 9-12. The conference, organized by Irene Natividad, focused on economic empowerment for women. The summit addressed the issue of how to define and market indigenous natural human resources and skills. Participants learned that women’s unpaid work is estimated at $11 trillion while the global informal economy itself is worth $17 trillion. Jobs, work, and family were cited as major concerns for women around the world. One of the successes mentioned was the fact that 400 women-owned businesses in the Philippines saw income increase of 78 percent. In Japan, president of General Engineering Company Mr. Mitsumasa Kawai opened a school for entrepreneurs after receiving 4,000 applicants for four grants to enable women to start their own businesses. Kawai noted at the conference that many Japanese women who study in the U.S. choose not to return to Japan because “Japan is very much behind the U.S.” in economic opportunities for women. Yet women comprise only 10 percent of almost 13,000 corporate officers in 500 of the largest companies in the U.S., according to the group Catalyst. The Global Summit offered women the opportunity to learn about economic opportunities for women around the world.


1/20/1997 - Oklahoma Abortion Clinic Bombed

The Reproductive Services Clinic was bombed on January 1, 1997 and again on January 19th. The abortion clinic, which offers a variety of family planning services, sustained minor damage and was closed for an afternoon after a bomb went off at the back of the clinic. No one was injured, and police do not yet have any suspects. A woman, identified only as Terry, who has worked at the clinic for fourteen years was outraged and commented, "Certain groups would consider this a victory, but what it is is an outright attack on women's rights."

This bombing came three days after an Atlanta abortion clinic was bombed twice and a month after an abortion doctor in New Orleans was stabbed fifteen times around the neck, chest and shoulders by an anti-abortion extremist.


1/20/1997 - Albright Unanimously Confirmed by Senate Foreign Relations Committee

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee unanimously voted to confirm Madeleine Albright as the first female Secretary of State of the United States on January 20th. The full Senate should vote on her confirmation by January 22nd. The committee's ranking Democrat, Senator Joseph Biden (D-Del) said that he expected her confirmation to "sail through the senate."


1/17/1997 - President Calls Abortion Clinic Bombing an Act of Terror

President Clinton, in a statement issued after an abortion clinic was bombed twice on January 16th, said, "The double bombing at a women's health clinic in Atlanta this morning was a vile and malevolent crime. Make no mistake: anyone who brings violence against a woman trying to exercise her constitutional rights is committing an act of terror. It is always wrong. And it should be punished severely." Demanding that abortion violence be categorized as "domestic terrorism," Eleanor Smeal, president of the Feminist Majority, commented, "We were horrified and outraged by news of this tragedy, but hardly surprised, since our press conference was called to bring attention to the persistent violence being targeted at abortion clinics nationwide."

The abortion clinic in Atlanta was bombed twice on January 16th; one blast going off at 9:30 in the morning and the other less than an hour later. The first bomb did not injure anyone, but did destroy the abortion clinic, which was on the ground floor of a in a high rise office complex. The second bomb injured officials and people who had gathered to investigate the first bombing. Ironically, at the same time the bomb went off in Atlanta, women's rights and abortion rights activists were holding a press conference in Washington D.C. to warn Americans that clinic violence is not a thing of the past. Though clinic violence has been decreasing, a 1996 Clinic Violence Survey conducted by the Feminist Majority Foundation indicates that one-third of clinics still experience severe abortion-related violence


1/17/1997 - Afghan Woman Beaten for Having Bare Ankles

Taliban militants in Kabul, Afghanistan beat a woman with a belt on the street as a crowd watched, witnesses said on January 16. A fighter from the militia said the woman was being punished for violating a strict Islamic dress code by leaving her ankles uncovered. Other women have been beaten publicly since September 27 when the Taliban took over the Afghan capital and decreed that women must cover themselves from head to toe in an expensive, restrictive garment called a burqa. The Taliban has also forbid women and girls from attending school and working. During the Ramadan holiday, restrictions are tighter. Women are allowed to leave their homes to attend a funeral, visit patients in hospitals, or to buy food, but are not to “go out of their houses without a legal excuse,” according to a document prepared for the Department for Promoting Virtue and Suppressing Vice.


1/17/1997 - Simpson Prosecutors Present Nicole’s Letter About Beating

In the wrongful death trial against O.J. Simpson, prosecutors presented the defendant with a letter written by his slain ex-wife in which Nicole Brown Simpson said O.J. “beat the holy hell out of me” during a 1986 argument. Nicole’s letter also made reference to “the New Year’s Eve beat-up” which led to Simpson pleading no contest to spousal battery. The letter went on “I called the cops to save my life, whether you believe it or not. I’ve never loved you since or been the same.” In the early weeks of the current civil trial, Simpson said he had “never” beat Nicole.

On January 15, the defense lost its bid to an appeals court that 30 additional photos of O.J. Simpson wearing Bruno Magli shoes not be admitted into evidence. The defense had previously tried to argue that one such picture was a fake before the 30 additional photos taken by another photographer were discovered. Simpson has denied owning a pair of Bruno Magli shoes, the type of shoe believed to have left bloody footprints at the scene of the murder of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.


1/17/1997 - New Breast Cancer Gene Identified

A paper published in this week’s Journal of Biological Chemistry reveals the discovery of a new gene that may play a role in breast cancer. Molecular biologists Hava Avrahman and Sheila Licht say the new gene, CHK, is “off” in normal breast tissue and in benign abnormalities but turns on when breast tissues becomes cancerous. Dr. Jerome Groopman, another researcher on the study, said this discovery suggests that CHK is “part of breast defense against cancer.” Any hereditary nature of the gene is not known.

Stanford University researchers have announced in the journal Cell that they have found a tumor suppressor gene called TSG101 which is absent from cancerous tissue in late-stage breast cancer patients but is present in non-cancerous tissue from the same patients.


1/17/1997 - Women Alumnae Wielding More Financial Power

Women alumnae are increasingly giving high donations to their schools, and reaping the benefits. Women are beginning to take a more active role in policy making committees and on University councils. Women who join the UCLA Women and Philanthropy Group give $25,000 over a period of five years and serve on a committee to help shape campus policy. At least twelve such councils now exist for women donors, whose universities are beginning to see as an untapped source of economic resources. Most universities are also finding, however, that the women donors want to see their money aid women on campus. Groups often want more women tenured as faculty, scholarships set aside for women students, money set aside to recruit female athletes, and programs created to help women enter the workforce.

At Harvard University, for example, a group calling itself the Committee for the Equality of Women at Harvard boycotted the school’s $2 billion capital fundraising program. They urged Radcliffe and Harvard alumni to put their money into an escrow account which would be withheld until Harvard added more tenured women to its faculty. Peggy Schmertzler, chair of the committee, said that women at the school held only 11.5 percent of tenured positions on the faculties of arts and sciences; nationally women hold 22.6 percent of such tenured positions. So far, the account has accumulated more than $500,000. Subsequently, Harvard has formed a Women and Leadership Task Force of 41 alumnae to serve in an advisory capacity. The Washington Post has a full report on what motivates women to give to their alma mater, accessible from the related on article on the paper’s Web site.


1/16/1997 - Abortion Clinic Building in Atlanta Sustains Two Explosions

At 9:30 a.m. on January 16, a professional building in the northern Atlanta suburb of Sandy Springs containing the office of the Atlanta Northside Family Planning Services sustained two explosions. No one was injured in the first blast which police think may have been a bomb, but the explosion broke windows and rocked nearby buildings. However, at least six people, including a cameraman and an agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, were injured in a subsequent blast in a dumpster outside the building an hour later. The second blast also damaged two cars parked near the dumpster and scattered debris over the area. Police Lt. C.C. Cass said, “It appears that the clinic was the target of (that) explosion. We can’t confirm, but it appears to be some kind of explosive device.”

As a security precaution, Atlanta Mayor Bill Campbell dispatched extra police officers to all abortion clinics in the city. Employees of the clinic were able to exit the clinic safely after the blast. Employee Antonette Simms said she believed the first explosion to have taken place in the front portion of the clinic. The clinic is located on the ground floor of a five-story building. A federal task force has been set up to investigate the explosions.


1/16/1997 - New Feminist Majority Foundation Survey Finds Severe Anti-abortion Violence Still Plagues Almost One-Third of Clinics

The Feminist Majority Foundation was joined by National Abortion Federation and Planned Parenthood Federation of America in releasing current statistics on clinic violence and calling for improved law enforcement response. At a press conference at the National Press Club on January 16, the Feminist Majority released its survey which found that that 29.5% of clinics faced severe anti-abortion violence in 1996. Severe types of violence included death threats, stalking, bombings and bomb threats, arsons and arson threats, blockades, invasions and chemical attacks. When gunfire, home picketing, and vandalism are combined with the other violence variables, the number of clinics and offices experiencing some form of violence, harassment or intimidation rises to 45.8%.

The data refute a spate of recent news articles that have claimed that clinic violence is over. Feminist Majority Foundation president Eleanor Smeal said, “Our systematic, social science survey contradicts recent impressionistic news accounts that say clinic violence is a thing of the past. Although the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act continues to be an effective tool in reducing clinic violence, our data and our day-in-day-out work with clinics tells us that the violence has by no means ended. Just two weeks ago a physician in New Orleans was brutally stabbed 15 times by an assailant who then traveled to a Baton Rouge clinic, where he was found lying in wait for a second physician. Fortunately, because of the vigilance of pro-choice advocates in New Orleans, this man, who is from Texas is now behind bars and is being charged with attempted murder.”

The survey also shows a correlation between incidence of violence and the response of law enforcement. Smeal said “The survey shows conclusively that better law enforcement has the capacity to decrease violence.” Buffer-zones were also found to be effective in decreasing violence.

Smeal noted that awareness of continued violence was important for pro-choice activists, clinics and the media, especially as the twenty-fourth anniversary of Roe v. Wade approaches and increased anti-abortion activity at clinics is expected.


1/16/1997 - Reno Speaks Out for Affirmative Action While Opponents Announce National Group

In her first major address devoted solely to civil rights, Attorney General Janet Reno spoke at a Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama about the continuing need for affirmative action to help women and people of color overcome discrimination. “We cannot say that we have completed our journey when even today blacks and Hispanics -- and in many cases, women -- still have a harder time getting into college, renting an apartment, getting a job, or obtaining a loan,” Reno said. “The next four years will see our continued attack on the legacy of discrimination that has created so much inequality and that continues to have a devastating impact on our society.”

Meanwhile, opponents of affirmative action and equal opportunity have created a group called the “American Civil Rights Institute” funded by foundations and individuals. Sacramento contractor Ward Connerly and others who led the fight to pass Proposition 209 in California, the measure aimed at outlawing affirmative action for women and people of color and gutting sex discrimination law, are behind the new organization. Founders and advisers include Thomas L. Rhodes, president of the conservative National Review, and Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist.


1/16/1997 - Attorney for Paula Jones Made Sex Jokes on Videotape

Gilbert K. Davis, attorney for Paula Jones and Republican candidate for Virginia attorney general made jokes about stripping and offering to help a client get in Playboy magazine, according to a videotape released by client Ramona Lemons Hines. Noting the hypocrisy of Davis’ nationally-televised comments about sexual harassment and President Clinton in light of the videotape, Hines said, “Gil Davis doesn’t live by the standards he talks about.” In the video, Davis says to Hines, “I know what you want to do. You want to take your clothes off. You want to take al of your clothes off and expose your body.” Davis also cranes his neck to kiss the camera lens, tells Hines to leave the Playboy idea “in my hands,” and jokes about barmaids dressed in shredded cellophane. Hines was looking for a buyer for the tape, but released it on January 14. Local news in Roanoke, Virginia covered the story and showed excerpts on television.

Davis is running in a June 10 primary for the Republican nomination for attorney general. He lives in Fairfax County, Virginia.


1/16/1997 - Feminist Majority Condemns Atlanta Bombing, Calls for Classification of Anti-Abortion Violence as Domestic Terrorism

New Survey Finds Severe Anti-abortion Violence Still Plagues Almost One-Third of Clinics


As the Feminist Majority Foundation, National Abortion Federation, and Planned Parenthood Federation of America were holding a press conference this morning on anti-abortion violence at clinics, we received word that yet another clinic has been destroyed by a bomb. We were horrified and outraged by news of this tragedy, but hardly surprised since our press conference was called to bring attention to the persistent violence being targeted at abortion clinics nationwide. In fact, our newly released 1996 National Clinic Survey had revealed an increase in clinic bombings between 1995 and 1996.
Passage and enforcement of the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act and pro-choice vigilance have reduced the percentage of clinics experiencing severe violence from over 50% in 1995 to 29.5% today. But to further reduce the violence we believe that anti-abortion violence must be classified as domestic terrorism and that increased federal, state, and local law enforcement resources must be allocated to crack the reign of terror.

Unacceptably high levels of violence continue at abortion clinics, putting clinic personnel, patients, and abortion rights in peril. As today’s bombing and our survey amply demonstrate, clinic violence is not a thing of the past. Our data and our day-in-day-out work with clinics tell us that the violence has by no means ended. Just two weeks ago a physician in New Orleans was brutally stabbed 15 times by an assailant who then traveled to a Baton Rouge clinic, where he was found lying in wait for a second physician. Fortunately, because of the vigilance of pro-choice advocates in New Orleans, this man, who is from Texas is now behind bars and is being charged with attempted murder.

Our survey shows conclusively that better law enforcement has the capacity to decrease violence. Clinics which reported ‘excellent’ law enforcement response experienced lower levels of violence than those which characterized law enforcement response as ‘poor.’ Clinics with buffer zones saw greater decreases in violence than those without buffer zone protection.

On the eve of the 24th anniversary of Roe v. Wade and an anticipated weekend of anti-abortion activities at clinics, it serves no one’s interest to allow pro-choice activists, clinics, and the media to be lulled into a sense of false security. Instead, we need to focus on improving response at all levels of law enforcement.


1/16/1997 - New Feminist Majority Foundation Survey Finds Severe Anti-abortion Violence Still Plagues Almost One-Third of Clinics

Data Refute Spate of News Articles Saying Violence Is Over

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- A newly released survey, conducted by the Feminist Majority Foundation, reveals that 29.5% of clinics faced severe anti-abortion violence in 1996. Severe types of violence included death threats, stalking, bombings and bomb threats, arsons and arson threats, blockades, invasions and chemical attacks. When gunfire, home picketing, and vandalism are combined with the other violence variables, the number of clinics and offices experiencing some form of violence, harassment or intimidation rises to 45.8%. “
Unacceptably high levels of violence continue at abortion clinics, putting clinic personnel, patients, and abortion rights in peril,” said Eleanor Smeal, President of the Feminist Majority Foundation. “Pro-choice vigilance, increased security measures at clinics, and improvements in law enforcement have reduced anti-abortion violence at women’s health clinics for the second consecutive year, but the rate of decline has slowed.”

Our systematic, social science survey contradicts recent impressionistic news accounts that say clinic violence is a thing of the past. Although the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act continues to be an effective tool in reducing clinic violence, our data and our day-in-day-out work with clinics tells us that the violence has by no means ended. Just two weeks ago a physician in New Orleans was brutally stabbed 15 times by an assailant who then traveled to a Baton Rouge clinic, where he was found lying in wait for a second physician. Fortunately, because of the vigilance of pro-choice advocates in New Orleans, this man, who is from Texas is now behind bars and is being charged with attempted murder.” Roe v. Wade and an anticipated weekend of anti-abortion activities at clinics, it serves no one’s interest to allow pro-choice activists, clinics, and the media to be lulled into a sense of false security. Instead, we need to focus on improving response at all levels of law enforcement.” “

The survey shows conclusively that better law enforcement has the capacity to decrease violence. Clinics which reported ‘excellent’ law enforcement response experienced lower levels of violence than those which characterized law enforcement response as ‘poor.’ And some aspects of law enforcement clearly are working. Clinics tell us that their reports of FACE violations are now being treated seriously. Buffer zones also are working -- the one-third of clinics which have buffer zones saw the greater decreases in violence than those without buffer zone protection,” said Smeal.

The survey found that clinics also are looking forward to being able to introduce new medical technologies to women which may diminish anti-abortion violence; over two-thirds (69.9%) of clinics are interested in providing mifepristone to their patients.

The survey, which covered violence committed during the first seven months of 1995, was completed by 312 clinics from 45 states and the District of Columbia. Ninety-five percent of these clinics offer a full range of gynecological and other health services in addition to abortion.


1/15/1997 - Citadel Alumni Call for Action on Hazing of Women Cadets

Hampton Walker, president of the 18,000-member Association of Citadel Men, has demanded the Citadel uncover the truth about the parties responsible for the hazing of two women cadets who have decided to leave the formerly all-male military college and transfer to the University of South Carolina. Walker said, “This doesn’t take any lengthy investigations and waiting around for a lot of reports. They should know what’s going on.” Walker said the alumni were ashamed of allegations that the Citadel did not ensure the safety of Kim Messer and Jeanie Mentavlos who say they were sexually harassed and had their clothes set on fire and their mouths filled with cleanser as part of illegal hazing. Interim Citadel president Clifton Poole has addressed the entire corps of cadets to warn against such behavior and says he takes responsibility for the treatment of the women cadets.

Two male cadets have been suspended pending a review while nine others have been charged with violations of the Citadel’s rules and regulations.


1/15/1997 - NOW and Other Groups Call Off Boycott Against Mitsubishi

National Organization for Women president Patricia Ireland and National Rainbow Coalition/PUSH founder Rev. Jesse Jackson have announced that they have called off their boycott of Mitsubishi which was inspired by widespread allegations of sexual harassment at the company’s Normal, Illinois plant. NOW, the Rainbow Coalition, the National Council of Negro Women and the National Minority Automobile Dealers came together with Mitsubishi on January 15 to announce the agreement. A prepared statement made by Jackson said the company has made a “commitment to end the hostile workplace environment for women and people of color, to pursue vigorously the resolution of this sex and race harassment crisis in Normal, Ill.” According to a statement prepared by Ireland, “With this commitment of Mitsubishi, we move from an adversarial and confrontational relationship to a partnership with the mutual goal of a model workplace and fair business practices.”

Twenty-nine women have filed a sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuit against the company, and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has filed another lawsuit on behalf of some 300 women who were allegedly fondled, propositioned, and threatened by male workers at the plant.


1/15/1997 - Henderson Allowed to Continue to Hear Prop 209 Suit

A federal judge in San Francisco ruled on January 14 that Judge Thelton Henderson can continue to hear the lawsuit against Proposition 209, the anti-affirmative action measure in California. Responding to objections that Henderson’s past membership of the American Civil Liberties Union would taint his ruling of the measure, U.S. District Judge Fern Smith said that Henderson’s “past membership in an organization which supports affirmative action does not render him unable to preside fairly over any case involving the question of affirmative action.” The group objecting to Henderson presiding over the case may appeal Smith’s decision.

Henderson issued a preliminary injunction blocking Prop 209 on December 23, putting the ruling on hold until a trial determines its constitutionality. Opponents of the measure have argued that Prop 209 violates the Constitution by keeping women and people of color from programs that would rectify discrimination while not keeping such opportunities from veterans and other groups.


1/15/1997 - Supreme Court Defines “15-Employee” Rule for Job Bias Cases

The Supreme Court has overturned a lower-court decision which dismissed a case in which the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued a company for illegally firing Darlene Walters. After being denied a promotion in 1990, Walters filed a gender-bias charge with the EEOC against Metropolitan Educational Enterprises and was subsequently fired. Lower courts dismissed the case on the grounds that it was not covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which limits anti-discrimination provisions to companies with 15 or more employees. The Supreme Court ruled on January 14 that employees are counted “for each working day after arrival and before departure” thus requiring Metropolitan to comply with Title VII. Previous rulings have based the number of employees on how many calendar weeks she or he worked.


1/14/1997 - Smeal Exposes Real Hypocrites of Paula Jones Scandal

Amid allegations that women’s groups have been hypocritical for failing to offer support to Paula Jones in her sexual harassment suit against President Clinton similar to that offered to Anita Hill, Feminist Majority president Eleanor Smeal has publicly clarified the distinctions between the two cases. "What is before the Supreme Court today is the power of the presidency, not sexual harassment law," said Smeal. However, the attorneys for Paula Jones have been casting things in a different light. Gil Davis and Joe Cammarata have taken the time the weekend before and day of the Supreme Court hearing to attack feminists on charges of hypocrisy. This strategic attack on feminists has been pursued since the beginning of this case.

Since Jones' press conference in 1994 when she levied her charges against Clinton, Jones has been surrounded by right wing opponents of women's rights who have attacked feminists. Supporting Jones have been a plethora of right wing organizations including the Landmark Legal Foundation, which supported Clarence Thomas' nomination to the Supreme Court and the Legal Affairs Council, which raised $300,000 for the defense of Oliver North during the Iran-Contra scandal.

"Hypocrisy," exclaimed Smeal, "look at the people who brought Jones to the public eye -- Floyd Brown, director of Citizen's United and developer of the Willie Horton ad; David Brock, writer for American Spectator and author of The Real Anita Hill; and Pat Mahoney, director of Christian Defense Coalition and one-time spokesperson for Operation Rescue. These people are not champions of women's rights."

"The feminist track record on the issue of sexual harassment is irrefutable. Sexual harassment should be treated seriously, and feminists have never wavered from this position. However, the born-again feminists of the right wing dismissed Anita Hill and were stridently anti-women's rights and anti-discrimination laws including sexual harassment laws. Now, who is the hypocrite?"

Anita Hill and Paula Jones are very different cases. In the 1991 Anita Hill case, feminists fought for a hearing on charges of sexual harassment before Clarence Thomas was appointed to the Supreme Court, and feminists demanded Anita Hill be heard publicly after the Senate's decision to close the hearings. In 1995, although Senator Bob Packwood (R-O) was pro-choice and a supporter of women's rights, feminists fought for the Senate Ethics Committee to open hearings on the sexual harassment charges brought against him. "Jones vs. Clinton, from the beginning, has been a court trial because Jones filed within the statute of limitations. Paula Jones will be heard," stated Smeal.


1/14/1997 - Citadel President Addresses Cadets About Hazing Incidents

Clifton Poole, interim president for the Citadel, spoke to the 1,700-member Corps of Cadets at the South Carolina military college on January 13 after two of the four female first-year cadets announced they would not be returning to the formerly all-male school. Poole admitted that the Citadel’s anti-hazing system had broken down and stated at a press conference following the cadet meeting that “all incidents of hazing will be reported to law enforcement.”

Eleven male cadets face discipline regarding charges by Kim Messer and Jeanie Mentavlos that the men set the women’s clothes on fire, put cleanser in their mouths and sexually harassed them. Messer and Mentavlos stated that the Citadel failed to keep the women safe and that they could not return to the school. Mentavlos’ brother, Michael, also plans to withdraw from the school just three credits short of graduation.

Messer’s lawyer questioned the Citadel’s commitment to making coeducation work. Attorney E. Paul Gibson said,” I question ... if (the Citadel administrators) know how seriously they’ll have to approach (coeducation) to make it work. The Citadel has expended huge amounts of capital and energy to prevent the entry of women. That’s what it impressed on the corps. Now they say they’ve made a 180-degree turn.”


1/14/1997 - Postmenopausal Health Study Needs Volunteers

The National Institutes of Health and the Women’s Health Initiative are seeking participants for a study on postmenopausal women’s health that could lead to discoveries about preventing heart disease, breast cancer, and other diseases. After three years of recruiting efforts, only 87,782 of the expected 163,500 slots were filled as of November, one year short of the recruitment cut-off. Areas with the most need in women to take or forgo hormones, women over the age of 65 and minority women. Interested women aged 50 to 79 are invited to call 1-800-549-6636.


1/14/1997 - Korean Women Pressured to Abort Girl Babies to Try for Sons

Although fetal sex identification and abortion are against the law in South Korea, women continue to feel pressure to abort girl fetuses in order to try for sons. Compared to a natural ratio of 105 boys born for every 100 girls (which later evens out to 1:1 since boys die earlier), some regions in South Korea have rates of 125 boys born to every 100 girls resulting in 30,000 fewer girls born each year than would be the case without sex-influenced abortions. The overall ratio in Korea is 116 boys to 100 girls. A Chinese government report in 1992 found the ratio in China at 118.5 boys to 100 girls, statistics which embarrassed the government enough that it never formally released the results.

Korean families are often disappointed when women produce daughters while news of boys is cause for celebration. “My mother-in-law called up my sister-in-law three times to tell her it was a boy,” said Lee Tae-rim, already a mother of two girls. “Soon after I delivered my son, my parents-in-law moved us into a larger apartment. They figured we needed an extra room for the baby boy.” Since women traditionally marry into the husband’s family, Koreans see a sonless family as one that will die when the father dies. However, women have recently made other gains in the country whose government legally removed discrimination against women in the inheritance of property. The government has also banned “males-only” job advertisements. Despite a 1994 ban on aborting female fetuses, however, the act remains common.