SIGN UP FOR JOBS NEWS & ALERTS:
print Print    Share Share  
Weekly Email Weekly News Email RSS Feed News RSS

Feminist News

Search Feminist News by keyword

Search News and/or 

first record   previous record  News Stories 13751 to 13775 of 13852  next record   last record


10/20/1995 - House Passes Medicare Overhaul, Clinton Vows Veto

House Republicans, and four Democrats, passed an historic ove rhaul of Medicare yesterday. The measure, which becomes part of the budget reconciliation bill going to the floor next week, cuts spending dramatically and encourages the elderly to turn to private managed care organizations. In a press conference, Pres ident Bill Clinton renewed his threat to veto the measure, commenting that it amounted to, "a $270 billion cut in Medicare that will eviscerate the health system for older Americans." Democrats argued that the bill cuts payments for the elderly to financ e tax cuts for the rich, and that it would force some hospitals to close for lack of funding. In effect, they argued, the measure increases premiums for the elderly, while simultaneously decreasing coverage.




10/20/1995 - Clinton Backs Anti-Discrimination Bill for Homosexuals

White House officials announced Thursday that President Clinton supports a bill which would outlaw workforce discrimination against homosexuals. Clinton wrote Senator Edward M. Kennedy (D-MA), the chief sponsor of the bill, that "Those who face this k ind of job discrimination have no legal recourse, in either state or federal courts. This is wrong." Clinton's support marks the first time a sitting President has backed a major bill aimed at achieving equal rights for homosexuals. The Employment Non-Discrimination Act would grant sexual or ientation the same status as race, sex, religion, color or national origin with regards to protections against bias in hiring promotions or dismissals. The bill would not, however, cover the armed forces, businesses with fewer than fifteen employees or r eligious institutions. Even with those concessions, few expect the bill to pass either the House or Senate.


10/20/1995 - Nearly Two-thirds of Elderly Women Fail to Get Mammograms

Despite increased risks of breast cancer with age and Medicare coverage of the procedure, nearly two-thirds of women over the age of 65 fail to get regular mammograms. Health officials from the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the H ealth Care Financing Administration announced yesterday that only 37% of women receiving Medicare have had at least one mammogram within the last two years. The study also found that women between the ages of 65 and 69 get mammograms at twice the rate o f women 80 to 84, even though the chances of breast cancer increases dramatically with age. By the age of 70, a woman has a one in fourteen chance of getting breast cancer -- that number jumps to one in ten by the age of 80. The National Cancer Institut e estimates that one in ten women develop breast cancer in their lifetimes.


10/20/1995 - Navy Officer Acquitted of Sexual Harassment Charges

A panel of five admirals and three captains, which included two women, found Captain Everett Greene innocent of "unduly familiar personal relationships." Two of his subordinates accused Greene, who at the time processed sexual harassment claims for th e Navy, of making them feel uneasy at work by repeatedly sending them cards and gifts. One woman commented that, "I didn't want to believe this was happening, He was a married man, my boss and old enough to be my father." The other woman commented, "th ey kept coming--it was like he always knew where I was."

The Navy has faced heightened scrutiny in its handling of sexual harassment cases since the infamous 1991 Tailhook incident. Eighty-three women claimed that Naval officers at the 1991 convention of the Tailhook Association assaulted them. According to investigations, as many as 200 men joined in the main offense, a poke-and-grab gauntlet along the third-floor corridor of the Las Vegas Hilton. Yet, after two years of investigation, not a single one of the 140 investigated received any sort of conv iction or disciplinary action.



10/20/1995 - Navy Officer Acquitted of Sexual Harassment Charges

A panel of five admirals and three captains, which included two women, found Captain Everett Greene innocent of "unduly familiar personal relationships." Two of his subordinates accused Greene, who at the time processed sexual harassment claims for th e Navy, of making them feel uneasy at work by repeatedly sending them cards and gifts. One woman commented that, "I didn't want to believe this was happening, He was a married man, my boss and old enough to be my father." The other woman commented, "th ey kept coming--it was like he always knew where I was."

The Navy has faced heightened scrutiny in its handling of sexual harassment cases since the infamous 1991 Tailhook incident. Eighty-three women claimed that Naval officers at the 1991 convention of the Tailhook Association assaulted them. According to investigations, as many as 200 men joined in the main offense, a poke-and-grab gauntlet along the third-floor corridor of the Las Vegas Hilton. Yet, after two years of investigation, not a single one of the 140 investigated received any sort of conv iction or disciplinary action.



10/18/1995 - European Court of Justice Strikes Down Affirmative Action Law

The European Court of Justice handed down a landmark sex discrimination ruling yesterday, finding an affirmative action law illegal The German law encouraged state agencies in Bremen to promote women over men, when both had equal qualifications. Earl ier a German Court had found the law consistent with employment practices and promoted equal opportunity for women. The European Court found, however, that it "goes beyond" EU equal opportunity legislation. Even if men dominate a particular field, compa nies can't give equally qualified women preference based on gender.

The European Union Executive Commission has attempted to promote affirmative action for women across the fifteen EU countries and expressed extreme disappointment with the decision. The EU labor commissioner Padraig Flynn commented that the Commission could modify EU employment law so that it explicitly endorsed, "positive action" for women.



10/18/1995 - Wilson Vetoes Contraception Measure Law

California Governor Pete Wilson vetoed a health insurance bill yesterday which included coverage of federally approved contraception methods. He stated that the increased cost to health insurance could hurt small businesses. But, Assembly woman Jacki e Speier (D-Burlingame) who sponsored the bill, commented at a press conference, attended by representatives from many women's groups, that every $1 spent on contraception save $4 to $15 in other costs. She commented that Wilson's veto clearly represente d, "a reproductive health setback for women and ensures our status as a Third World country in terms of family planning."



10/18/1995 - Women's Sports Foundation Nominates Sportswomen of the Year

At its annual dinner Monday, the Women's Sports Foundation named basketball star Rebecca Lobo and speedskater Bonnie Blair "Sportswomen of the Year." Lobo led her Connecticut team to an undefeated season and the 1995 NCAA title. Blair has won five Ol ympic gold medals and broke her own world record last year in the 500 meters race.

Christine Grant, the athletic director at Iowa University, received the Billie Jean King Contribution Award. The Colorado Silver Bullets, America3, the USA national basketball team and the late Wilma Rudolph received special tributes. The Foundation also inducted the following women into the International Women's Sports Hall of Fame: nine-time New York City marathon winner Grete Waitz, Swedish orienteer Annichen Kringstad, Texas basketball coach Jody Conradt, former Prairie View A&M track and field coach Barbara Jacket, founder of the Women's Professional Golf Association Betty Hicks and badminton champion Judy Devlin Hashman.

TNT will televise the event at 10 p.m. on October 21, 1995.



10/17/1995 - Supreme Court Rejects Appeal from Anti-Abortion Demonstrators

The Supreme Court yesterday, without comment, turned down an appeal claiming that a San Jose ordinance banning picketing near a doctor's private residence violated the free speech clause. The ordinance disallows demonstrations within 300 feet of targ eted private residences. The Court's ruling is consistent with previous rulings which allow the bans on picketing near private residences. In June the Court rejected a challenge to the FACE law, which places federal limits on protests near abortion-clin ics. In October, the Court let stand rulings in a Virginia case which stated that the FACE law does not infringe on expression or religion rights


TNT will televise the event at 10 p.m. on October 21, 1995.



10/17/1995 - California Law Bans Pricing Differences Based on Gender

Governor Pete Wilson signed a bill into law yesterday which bans charging men and women differently. As of January 1, 1996 the law bans charging different prices for services such as haircuts, dry cleaning and tailoring. Violators can expect to pay $ 1000 or up to three times the actual damages and attorney's fee. The bill does not, however, mandate that vendors price products equally, only services.



10/17/1995 - Senator Mikulski Mugged Outside Home

U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski's (D-MD) office said today that someone mugged the Senator outside her home on Sunday night at approximately 11:45 p.m. A man in a blue sweat suit approached her as she headed inside. He knocked her down, stole her purse and left. Mikulski dislocated her hand while trying to defend herself.



10/17/1995 - Eighteen Inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame

Eighteen women were inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame on Saturday. They are:

Virginia Apgar (1909-1974) - Invented the Apgar Scale, a life-saving health assessment test for newborns. Physician.
Ann Bancroft - First woman to reach the North and South Poles across the ice.
Amelia Bloomer (1818-1894) - Founded the first newspaper concerned with equality for women, The Lilly.
Mary Breckinridge (1881-1965) - Founded the Frontier Nursing Service which provides health care in rural areas.
Eileen Collins - First American woman to pilot a spacecraft.
Elizabeth Dole - Political leader, the first woman secretary of transportation.
Anne Dallas Dudley (1876-1955) Tennessee suffrage leader instrumental in the passage of the 19th Amerndment.
Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) - Started the Church of Christ, Scientist thus becoming the first American woman to found a worldwide religion
Ella Fitzgerald - Singer.
Margaret Fuller (1810-1850) - Feminist transcendentalist leader and teacher.
Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826-1898) - Suffrage leader and author.
Lillian Moller Gilbreth (1878-1972) - Industrial engineer and motion study expert. Improved industry and the home.
Nannerl Keohane - First woman president of Duke university. Political Scientist.
Maggie Kuhn (1905-1995) - Founded the Gray Panthers.
Sandra Day O'Connor - First woman justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.
Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin (1842-1924) - Abolitionist. Leader and organizer of African American women's organizations.
Patricia Schroeder - U.S. congresswoman. Her legislation has helped women tremendously.
Hannah Greenebaum Solomon (1858-1942) - Founder of the National Council of Jewish Women.


10/13/1995 - Tamoxifen Study Launched

An organization of British doctors have asked 20,000 women to volunteer for a four-year cancer study. The Cancer Research Campaign plans to study the drug tamoxifen to find out if four years is enough time to take the treatment. Tamoxifen is an anti-hor monal compound, available on the market for twenty years, which doctors use to treat breast cancer patients. Additional Breast Cancer Information



10/13/1995 - UC Students Demand Restoration of Affirmative Action

Students across the University of California school system protested yesterday their Regent's summer decision to repeal affirmative action. During the summer, when school was not in session, Regents voted to drop race and gender as factors in admissio ns, hiring and contracting against the advice of all nine chancellors. Thousands of students held class walkouts, teach-ins, rallies and marches on all nine UC campuses to protest the decision and demand that the Regents rescind it.



10/13/1995 - Navy Officer Responsible for Handling Sexual Harrassment Claims Accused of Sexual Harrassment

The Navy officer responsible for handling sexual and racial harrassment complaints is undergoing a court martial for allegedly sexually harassing two female subordinates. Captain Everett Greene, who was in line for promotion to rear Admiral, faces acc usations of having an "unduly familiar personal relationship with a junior subordinate," of "creating a hostile work environment," and conduct unbecoming an officer. Yesterday, former Navy Lt. Pamela Castrucci told the Court Martial panel that in 1993, when she worked for Greene, she could not stop his overtures and became increasingly frustrated by them. Lt. Mary E. Felix also accuses him of writing to them, refusing to stop when requested and using his rank to intimidate them. The Navy, besieged by sexual harassment complaints since the 1991 Tailhook incident, has created an eight member panel (five of whom are admirals) to hear the cases. Greene is possibly the highest ranking officer to face a court martial since World War II.




10/13/1995 - Navy Officer Responsible for Handling Sexual Harrassment Claims Accused of Sexual Harrassment

The Navy officer responsible for handling sexual and racial harrassment complaints is undergoing a court martial for allegedly sexually harassing two female subordinates. Captain Everett Greene, who was in line for promotion to rear Admiral, faces acc usations of having an "unduly familiar personal relationship with a junior subordinate," of "creating a hostile work environment," and conduct unbecoming an officer. Yesterday, former Navy Lt. Pamela Castrucci told the Court Martial panel that in 1993, when she worked for Greene, she could not stop his overtures and became increasingly frustrated by them. Lt. Mary E. Felix also accuses him of writing to them, refusing to stop when requested and using his rank to intimidate them. The Navy, besieged by sexual harassment complaints since the 1991 Tailhook incident, has created an eight member panel (five of whom are admirals) to hear the cases. Greene is possibly the highest ranking officer to face a court martial since World War II.




10/12/1995 - New Compounds Tested for Post-Menopausal Women

Early tests of new synthetic compounds show that they could protect women from heart disease and osteoporosis in the same way estrogen does. Taking estrogen hormone supplements after menopause helps reduce the risk of heart disease in women and bone-t hinning osteoporosis. Some women don't take estrogen, however, because of its possible side-effects -- increased risk of certain cancers. The compounds, now in testing stages, don't incur those possible side-effects.

Though similar to estrogen, doctors warn that differences nonetheless remain. Unlike estrogen, the synthetic compounds don't prevent hot flashes associated with menopause, nor do they raise the "good" type of cholesterol. Doctors also believe that est rogen might protect against Alzheimer's disease and colon cancer, but they don't know if the compounds have similar effects. The compounds still remain years away from market sales, but analysts predict that they could create profits in the hundreds of m illions.


10/12/1995 - New Compounds Tested for Post-Menopausal Women

Early tests of new synthetic compounds show that they could protect women from heart disease and osteoporosis in the same way estrogen does. Taking estrogen hormone supplements after menopause helps reduce the risk of heart disease in women and bone-t hinning osteoporosis. Some women don't take estrogen, however, because of its possible side-effects -- increased risk of certain cancers. The compounds, now in testing stages, don't incur those possible side-effects.

Though similar to estrogen, doctors warn that differences nonetheless remain. Unlike estrogen, the synthetic compounds don't prevent hot flashes associated with menopause, nor do they raise the "good" type of cholesterol. Doctors also believe that est rogen might protect against Alzheimer's disease and colon cancer, but they don't know if the compounds have similar effects. The compounds still remain years away from market sales, but analysts predict that they could create profits in the hundreds of m illions.


10/11/1995 - Supreme Court Hears Gay Rights Case

The Supreme heard arguments yesterday in Romer vs. Evans, an appeal from the Colorado Supreme Court. That court ruled last year that a state, voter-approved constitutional amendment that banned laws which protected homosexuals against discrimin ation denied them equal protection. Both sides received help and tough questioning from the justices, with only Justice Thomas failing to enter the debate on Colorado's Amendment 2. Both Chief Justice Rehnquist and Justice Scalia seemed to favor Colorad o Solicitor General Timothy M. Tymkovich's case.

However, Justices O'Connor and Kennedy, who now hold the swing votes in many of the crucial cases before the court, seemed troubled by the state's case. Kennedy asked the first question minutes into the hearing and effectively dismissed as irrelevent to the present case the precedent around which Tymkovich centered his case. O'Connor seemed especially troubled about the impact of the amendment and asked whether or not, for example, the ban would permit libraries to disallow homosexuals from checking out books. When the state replied that it would not cut off homosexuals from normal legal protections, O'Connor responded, "How do we know that?" Justice Ginsburg also asked whether or not a hospital allocating scarce resources could deny a kidney dial ysis machine to homosexuals. Because the amendment has not been authoritatively interpreted or put into practice, Tymocovich responded with, "We don't know."


10/11/1995 - Flight Attendants Win Raise from American

A three-member arbitration panel created to solve a labor dispute between flight attendants and American Airlines awarded the flight attendants a 17 percent pay increase over the next six years. The panel rejected American's plans to cut vacation pay by 25% and reduce pay for layovers and periods between flights. The panel also established wage rates based on comparison of rates paid by United and Delta Airlines. The Association of Professional Flight attendants started the process in 1993 by initi ating a five-day, pre-Thanksgiving strike to resolve wage disputes. The strike ended after President Clinton intervened and management agreed to arbitration.


10/11/1995 - Athletic Shoe Companies to Target Women

Title IX has spurred a dramatic growth in women's participation in sports since its passage in 1972. In 1971, one in twenty-seven girls played school sports, but the Women's Sports Foundation found that that number soared to one in three girls playin g school sports in 1994. This past year, women spent more on athletic shoes than men for the first time, $5.4 billion versus $5.2 billion. However, only 15% of Nike's $138 million ad budget from last year went to ads solely targetng women. Nike and Ree bok both plan to step up their products and advertising for women with Nike CEO Phil Knight admitting that, "the company recently got a little less stupid."

Already, Reebok has initiated educational programs and created Girls' Sports Summit to encourage girls to play sports. The company also hosted a Sports Training Challenge for high school junior and senior female athletes this past summer. Nike has wo n critical acclaim for its recent advertisements which urge parents to encourage their girls to play sports. In the ad, girls say how playing sports helps their physical fitness and makes them feel better about themselves. One girl says that playing spo rts will make her more likely to leave her husband if he beats her.


10/11/1995 - Athletic Shoe Companies to Target Women

Title IX has spurred a dramatic growth in women's participation in sports since its passage in 1972. In 1971, one in twenty-seven girls played school sports, but the Women's Sports Foundation found that that number soared to one in three girls playin g school sports in 1994. This past year, women spent more on athletic shoes than men for the first time, $5.4 billion versus $5.2 billion. However, only 15% of Nike's $138 million ad budget from last year went to ads solely targetng women. Nike and Ree bok both plan to step up their products and advertising for women with Nike CEO Phil Knight admitting that, "the company recently got a little less stupid."

Already, Reebok has initiated educational programs and created Girls' Sports Summit to encourage girls to play sports. The company also hosted a Sports Training Challenge for high school junior and senior female athletes this past summer. Nike has wo n critical acclaim for its recent advertisements which urge parents to encourage their girls to play sports. In the ad, girls say how playing sports helps their physical fitness and makes them feel better about themselves. One girl says that playing spo rts will make her more likely to leave her husband if he beats her.


10/11/1995 - Gingrinch and AMA Strike Deal

The American Medical Association announced Tuesday night its support for the G.O.P Medicare plan. This announcement comes after an agreement between House Speaker Gingrich and AMA leaders whereby the redesign of Medicare would not cut fees paid to doc tors. The agreement would also limit payment of damages to victims of medical malpractice and exempt doctors from antitrust laws in certain situations. Under the pre-agreement reform, $26 billion in savings over seven years would have come from cutting doctors' payments. It is likely that now the plan will pass those costs on to the elderly, who already face dramatic premium increases and reduced coverage.


10/11/1995 - Governors Oppose Ban on Some Welfare Aid

A group of U.S. governors has sent a bipartisan letter to Congress urging them not to place bans on aid to teenage mothers with children or mothers who have additional children while on welfare. Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson (R) and Nevada Governo r Robert Miller (D) urged Congress to give states maximum flexibility in setting their own rules, reported The Washington Post. The paper did not list the names of all the governors who signed the letter.

The House and Senate Welfare bills effectively end guaranteed aid to children and turn welfare into block grants to states. The bills also limit aid to five years, cap overall funding and demand work after two years. The House bill goes on to deny fe deral money to teen-age mothers, refuses to give additional money to mothers on welfare who have more children and give states control of school lunch programs.


10/11/1995 - Number of Female Executives Increasing

In 1977 forty-six women served on the boards of Fortune 500 Companies. Today 600 women serve on the boards, with more than 40% of them rising to those positions from the corporate ranks. That's up from 22% in 1983 who got to the boards from go vernment or university positions. Their history with the companies makes them more likely candidate for CEO positions. Though no Fortune 500 Companies have women CEOs yet, their presence on the boards and their history with their companies is hel ping to crack the glass ceiling.