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10/31/1995 - Abortion Clinic Evicted From Building

Judge John DiNoto has ruled that a landlord may evict the Long Island Gynecological service. The lease permits abortions on the premises but, under new terms agreed to in January, the lease prohibits any activity that "jeopardizes the safety and prope rty of other tenants." Because many persons have violently attacked clinic members and other tenants, the landlord argued that the clinic violated the terms of their lease. Representative Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), who sponsored the 1994 F.A.C.E. bill, c alled the ruling "mind-boggling" and said that, "It is going to have a profound effect on a woman's right to choose. These fringe pro-life groups found new ways to get rid of abortion clinics." The clinic plans to appeal the ruling.



10/31/1995 - New Details Released in Breast Implant Case

Judge Sam C. Point, Jr, who presides over the silicone breast implant case, released new details on Friday concerning the proposed settlement. The release includes proposals that would once again reduce the amount paid to the thousands of women injure d by the implants. Court officials also plan to increase scrutiny of possible fraud by doctors and patients. The released figures will likely disappoint many women because of the reduced rates. Many women have already signaled that instead of accepting the settlement they plan to pursue individual suits. Already, if all eligible women participate in the plan, the three companies involved -- Brisol-Myers Squibb, Baxter Healthcare, and 3M -- could pay anywhere from $2 to $3 billion dollars in damages.



10/31/1995 - New Details Released in Breast Implant Case

Judge Sam C. Point, Jr, who presides over the silicone breast implant case, released new details on Friday concerning the proposed settlement. The release includes proposals that would once again reduce the amount paid to the thousands of women injure d by the implants. Court officials also plan to increase scrutiny of possible fraud by doctors and patients. The released figures will likely disappoint many women because of the reduced rates. Many women have already signaled that instead of accepting the settlement they plan to pursue individual suits. Already, if all eligible women participate in the plan, the three companies involved -- Brisol-Myers Squibb, Baxter Healthcare, and 3M -- could pay anywhere from $2 to $3 billion dollars in damages.



10/31/1995 - Filipino Maid Sentenced to 100 Lashes and Year in Prison


A Filipino maid accused of killing her male employer received a sentence of 100 lashes, a year in prison, a monetary penalty and faces deportation. She had to agree to pay the victim's family 150,000 dirhams ($41,000) blood money in order for them to drop their insistence that the death penalty be carried out. In a United Arab Emirtes Jail, Filipino maid Sarah Balabagan pleaded for mercy from the lashes. Supporters plan to ask UAE President Sheikh Zaid bin Sultan al-Nahayan for her pardon. Balabaga n claims she acted in self-defense as her employer was raping her when she killed him.


10/30/1995 - Several-Hundred Million Dollar Suit Filed Against Anti-Abortion Organizations


The Legal Action for Reproductive Rights filed a several-hundred million dollar federal lawsuit on Thursday against American Coalition of Life Activists and Advocates for Life Ministries. The plaintiffs, filing in Portland, Oregon, allege that the anti-abortion organizations conducted a "campaign of terror and intimidation" that violated the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act and the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

The law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison is handling the plaintiff's case pro bono. Laura J. Allan, an attorney with the Feminist Majority Foundation, serves as "of counsel" in the case.



10/30/1995 - Clinton Administration to Conduct Welfare Study


At the behest of Senate Democrats, President Clinton has announced the launch of a new welfare study. The study will analyze how the Republican welfare plan adversely affects millions of children. Senator Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.) and eleven other Democrats alleged that the White House had conducted a study which showed that one million more children than originally estimated would fall into poverty if the Republican plan takes effect. In response, the Clinton Administration announced that the Department of Health and Human Services had indeed conducted a study in September. Furthermore, Office of Management and Budget Director Alice M. Rivlin announced that the administration plans to undertake a new analysis of the "impact of this bill on children leaving poverty."


10/30/1995 - Irvine Students Protesting End of Affirmative Action Arrested


Five persons were arrested while camping out and conducting a thirteen-day hunger strike protesting the Board of Regents' July 20th decision ending affirmative action for California universities, . The protesters at the University of California at Irvine campus were arrested, along with two supporters, for obstructing a police officer. The police moved in when the protesters stayed longer than their permit allowed.


10/30/1995 - Irvine Students Protesting End of Affirmative Action Arrested


Five persons were arrested while camping out and conducting a thirteen-day hunger strike protesting the Board of Regents' July 20th decision ending affirmative action for California universities, . The protesters at the University of California at Irvine campus were arrested, along with two supporters, for obstructing a police officer. The police moved in when the protesters stayed longer than their permit allowed.


10/30/1995 - Gingrinch Supports California's Anti-Affirmative Action Initiative

House Speaker Newt Gingrich announced on Friday his support for the anti-affirmative action initiative in California. Gingrich asserted, in a letter to Republican donors soliciting funds for the initiative, that the country must resolve the debate on affirmative action in favor of "individual rights over group rights." The initiative would place a state constitutional ban on gender and race preferences, which essentially eliminates any affirmative action programs for women and minorities.


10/30/1995 - Clinton Announces Refusal to Accept Current Budget in Radio Speech

President Clinton stated in his weekly radio address Saturday that, unless Republicans soften budget cuts in education and health care for the poor, "there is nothing more for us to talk about." His wording suggests that unless Republicans make changes to the current budget bill, Clinton plans to veto it. In response to Republican threats to refuse to raise the federal debt limit if Clinton vetoes the budget bill, he also commented that, "I'm not about to give into that kind of blackmail, so Congress should simply stop playing political games with the full faith and credit of the United States of America."


10/30/1995 - Wellesley Trains Women for Top-level Executive Positions

Wellesley has produced more top-level executive women than any other college, large or small. Seventy-five corporations recruit on its campus every year and strong networking amongt alumnae and students helps women gain entry into the nation's top firms. Of Fortune 500 companies, seventeen female directors graduated from Wellesley. And, of female senior executives, 1.8% graduated from Wellesley. A strong economics department also ensures that Wellesley women are overrepresented at the best business schools, such as Harvard's.

Some prominent Wellesley alumnae include: Laurel Cutler, the Vice-Chair of FCB/Leber-Katz; Lois Juliber, the President of Colgate North Ameirca; Jeanette Loeb, a partner at Golden, Sachs & Company; Ellen R. Marram, the President of Seagram Beverage group. Other Wellesley gradautes in senior business posts include: Ilene Beal, Executive Vice-President of BayBanks; Karen Crider, General Counsel of Stride Rite; and Nancy Lampton, Chief Executive of American Life and Accident Insurance Company of Kentucky.


10/27/1995 - Detroit Ordered to Distribute $10.8 Million to Over 890 Female Police Officers and Job Applicants

A federal judge has approved a plan for the distribution of $10.8 million to settle a sex-discrimination suit filed against Detroit's police department. Judge Paul Gadola's ruling ends a twenty-two year long suit which includes over 890 women who comp lained of systematic discrimination against a class of women. When the suit was filed in 1973, the department required female officers to receive at least two years of college training while it didn't require any college training for men. Female officer s also received less pay then the men and lost promotions because of their sex.


10/27/1995 - GAO Reports Finds Women Underrepresented at Four Federal Agencies

A new report from the General Accounting Office states that while women have made progress, they are still underrepresented at four departments -- the Departments of the Interior, Agriculture, Navy and State. The unequal representation is especially m anifest among the higher grades. The report concluded that, "In general, the relative numbers of women and minorities in each agency increased between 1984 and 1992. As of September 1992, however, certain EEO groups were still underrepresented on an ove rall basis and often underrepresented to a greater degree in key jobs when compared to the [civilian work force]." The report also concluded that the agencies fail to adequately analyze their recruitment, hiring and promotion procedures and thus do not i dentify the fundamental causes of underrepresentation. Neither the Office of Personnel Police officers in Maryland's Prince George's County who use racist or sexist language can now can now be fired, fined, or suspended, under a new policy that makes such offenses comparable in seriousness to police brutality. Police Chief John S. Farrell, responding to recent incidences of racism in his department, was quoted as saying he wanted to "send a clear message that this kind of conduct is absolutely unacceptable." The new policy applies to any incidences of demeaning, derogatory, or abusive lan guage relating to race, gender, or religion. Management nor the EEOC provide the oversight necessary to ensure that the agencies' affirmative employment programs correct the underrepresentation.



10/27/1995 - Maryland Police Chief Sends Message: Racism, Sexism Could Get You Fired

Police officers in Maryland's Prince George's County who use racist or sexist language can now can now be fired, fined, or suspended, under a new policy that makes such offenses comparable in seriousness to police brutality. Police Chief John S. Farrell, responding to recent incidences of racism in his department, was quoted as saying he wanted to "send a clear message that this kind of conduct is absolutely unacceptable." The new policy applies to any incidences of demeaning, derogatory, or abusive lan guage relating to race, gender, or religion.


10/26/1995 - Anti-Abortion Group Must Pay Doctor $8.6 Million in Damages

Three anti-abortion groups -- Operation Rescue, Missionaries to the Pre-Born, and the Dallas Pro-Life Action Network -- must pay a doctor $8.6 million in damages for harassing and trying to force him to stop performing abortions. A federal jury yester day ordered the payment to Dr. Tompkins who received harassment, abuse, stalking, telephone harassment and mail threats from the groups for over ten months. Eventually, Tompkins had to shut down his practice and move out of town.


10/26/1995 - House Lawmakers Refuse to Back Down on Welfare Cuts

House Republicans refuse to back down on provisions of the welfare reform bill which deny money to unwed teens who have children and which give states control of school lunch programs. The House and Senate, trying to come up with compromises on their differing versions of welfare reform, have had difficulty reaching consensus. House members opened negotiations by making changes to the Senate version, but not to the House version. The House did agree to provisions which would allow continued funding to teen mothers who stay in school. Democrats, however, criticized Republicans for refusing to accept parts of the Senate bill which exempt parents with infants from work requirements and provide money for child care and other issues.


10/26/1995 - Budget Cuts Threaten Mammography Research

Indiscriminate budget cuts threaten to eliminate research vital to improving mammography procedures. The Senate has proposed completely cutting funding for the Defense Department's Focused Research Initiative (FRI). The FRI includes a $4 million allo cation for the Stanford-Conductus project, which seeks to develop a cost-effective magnetic resonance imagining (MRI) technique for use in detecting breast cancer. Over 50,000 die annually from breast cancer.


10/25/1995 - Appeals Court Rejects Wilson's Affirmative Action Challenge

A California Appeals Court yesterday rejected Governor Pete Wilson's suit seeking to abolish five affirmative action laws. The three-member court voted two to one and without comment not to hear the suit which would have eliminated state contracting a nd hiring based on gender and race. Wilson plans to appeal to the state Supreme Court.

Wilson generally supported preferences for women and minorities until last winter. Indeed, during his first gubernatorial term, he signed many bills which reaffirmed affirmative action. He announced the suit last August when he also made his bid for the presidency. He planned to use his opposition to affirmative action as the cornerstone of his campaign.


10/25/1995 - Texas SEC Lose Sexual Harassment Suit

U.S. District Judge Kenneth Hoyt has ruled that males at the Houston office of the Securities and Exchange Commission sexually harassed female employees. Hoyt ruled that Wanderlon Ann Barnes, an African-American lawyer for the SEC who initiated the su it, is entitled to monetary damages because her supervisor engaged in various "sexual and vulgar acts." For example, in meetings with women the supervisor, Joseph Matta, would often sit at his desk, looking down at his crotch while closing and opening hi s legs. The ruling also singled out Christopher Browne, now the Fort Worth office's district administrator, for sexually harassing Barnes and other women. In Tuesday's Washington Post Browne commented, "The allegations of sexual harassment the ju dge said happened in that Houston office never happened. If they did happen, they aren't very bad, are they?" Barnes attorney, S. Beville May, however, commented that the ruling was, "dynamite...a scathing indictment of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission's pervasive racist and sexist conduct towards talented women and minorities."


10/24/1995 - Doctors Claim U.K. Officials Misinterpreted Study Results

According to a doctor involved in the study, England's Department of Health misinterpreted the study's finding that new forms of birth control pills increased the risk of blood clots. The Department warned that women who take the new forms of birth co ntrol pills double their chances of blood clots. However, Walter O. Spitzer, involved in the study, stated that the Department's warning could cause an unnecessary pill scare. He claims his study showed only a "a modest association" between the pills an d blood clotting, noting that it is not clear whether or not a causal link exists.


10/24/1995 - G.O.P. Medicaid Plan to Leave 12 Million Without Health Coverage and Force Closing of Hospital Emergency Rooms

The Consumers Union, who publish Consumer Reports magazine, and the National Health Law Program Inc. report that under the proposed G.O.P. Medicaid reform plan, 12 million Americans would lose their health coverage. Furthermore, because of lack of funding, many hospitals would be forced to close their emergency rooms. The groups based their study on California's experiences when the state cut projected Medicaid spending by 18% in the 1980s. As a result of the cuts, eleven out of twenty-three trauma centers closed, with all thirteen emergency rooms in central L.A. closed to ambulance traffic bi-weekly. Jeanne Finberg, the senior attorney for the Consumer's Union, commented that, "If the current Medicaid proposal becomes law, the cuts are so d eep and so deadly that California's experience will pale in comparison to the hardship that may sweep the nation."

The Senate takes the measure up on Wednesday and may vote on it by Friday. The House takes the measure up on Thursday and may vote on it that same day.


10/24/1995 - Rebecca Lobo named NCAA Women's College Player of the Year Award

A Phi Beta Kappa student, Rebecca Lobo led Connecticut's basketball team to an undefeated championship season. For her work and sportswomanship, the NCAA chose her as the NCAA Woman of the Year. Aside from playing basketball and graduating with a 3.6 GPA, Lobo volunteered for the Paul Newman Hole in the Wall Gang for terminally ill children. She has also participated in and co-chaired the Susan G. Koman Breast Cancer Foundation-Connecticut Race for the Cure Benefit. The NCAA chose her for the award from an applicant pool of 392.


10/24/1995 - Small Businesses May Not Discriminate Against Pregnant Women

The California State Supreme Court denied review of an appellate court decision which refused to exempt small businesses from discriminating against pregnant women. The appellate court ruled that pregnancy discrimination exists as a type of sex discri mination and therefore small businesses, (in this case, those with less than five workers), though generally exempt from some job discrimination laws, are bound by the law. Because the state Supreme Court denied review, that decision is now binding on all California trial courts. Women.


10/23/1995 - Defense Department Ends Aid to Minority Firms

Since 1987 the Pentagon has used the "rule of two" when awarding contracts. The rule states that if two or more qualified small disadvantaged firms indicate interest in bidding for a contract, then only disadvantaged firms may compete for it. Last yea r, the rule resulted in $1 billion in federal business going to minority firms. In the first action resulting from President Clinton's affirmative action legal review, the Defense Department announced that it plans to suspend the rule, partly because it became legally vulnerable after this summer's Supreme Court Adarand v. Pena decision. As minorities own the majority of these disadvantaged firms, this decision seriously and negatively impacts their bidding prospects.


10/23/1995 - Canadian New Democratic Party Elects Female Leader

On October 14th, Canada's left-wing party elected Alexa McDonough, 51, as its new leader. For the past fourteen years, McDonough has led the Nova Scotia New Democrats and now faces a large challenge in resuscitating the national party. After winning a race in which she was considered the definitive underdog, McDonough commented, "We have a federal government that is basically dismantling its commitment to some of the things that matter most to people's lives.... The fight of our lives is to turn thi s country around." For thirty-four years, the party has existed as a combination of agrarian socialists and labor unions. It began many of the social safety net programs in Canada, including its universal health-care system, but has come into rough time s recently as voters increasingly seek budge cuts. In 1993 they plummeted to only nine parliamentary seats. McDonough commented that the party would need "tough slogging and patient persuasion" to offer voters an acceptable alternative to conservative m easures.